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Visiting the Locations of Game of Thrones – Part 2

For anyone brave enough to want to venture north of the wall, you want to get yourself over to the frosty depths of Iceland. Many locations across the country have been used to bring this place to life, a frequent favourite amongst these spots however is Hyverfjall volcano. The volcano towers over a vast plain of snow in the winter that you’ll have seen many an army marching over and many a man scaling. Another memorable spot here is the lava fields of Dimmuborgir, this is where we find the haunted forests of the north that even the wildlings feel reasonably uncomfortable in. You may remember this as the spot where Samwell and the Lord Commander were attacked by the mindless white walkers. For those that were taken by the unlikely and somewhat tragic relationship between Jon Snow and Ygritte you may want to take a trip to the Grjótagjá cave, where their love first blossomed (to put it politely). If you’re looking for the absolute north of the wall experience it’s worth taking the trip in winter however it’s worth noting that it’s not a cheap trip, travelling in Spring or Autumn will provide lower costs, not to mention a more reasonable climate.

We’ve talked about the centre of the Seven Kingdoms and the depths of the frozen north but there is likely nowhere that has a softer spot in the hearts of most fans than the home of Stark family, the main characters in these beloved stories. This keep is known as Winterfell and It’s the first place we really get to know in the series. We see the young Stark children learning and Ned ‘Sean Bean’ Stark fretting, it reminds us of a time when we were naïve to the torrent of sorrow that was waiting for us out in the wide world. Later it would become a home to much of this sorrow and it would break our hearts. In Northern Ireland, 40 minutes from Belfast you’ll find the 820-acre walled demesne of Castle Ward in County Down. This provides much of the filming locations for Winterfell including many of the exterior shots of the fortifications and its courtyard. Grassy fields nearby also played hosts to many of the series’ army camps including those that resided outside the red wedding, a moment that any still recoils in shock at. If you plan on visiting Winterfell for yourself you surely won’t be disappointed, there is a whole host of Thrones themes tours and activities that’ll treat to a great day out. Perhaps the best (and certainly most fun) way to see all the filming locations here is to take the cycle tour. You’ll hop aboard your own ‘Westeros Cruiser’ bicycle which is issued to you by the Keeps Master-At-Arms, you’ll be given a map of where to go and see some of Winterfell’s more memorable sites.

Other Activities include an archery movie set experience, where you can learn to use a bow and arrow in the same spot young Bran Stark did, you can learn axe throwing in an authentic Game of Thrones costume and if that wasn’t enough why not meet two stars of the show?

The direwolfs Summer and Grey Wind live here too, they look much taller on camera though.